Lime Green Jello Conspiracy….

I have mentioned here before that my grandmother had lived with us during my teen and college years. When my parents could no longer keep care of her they put her into a facility near by that could keep care of her. My mother went everyday, usually about 4-5 hours a day. I truly don’t know how she did it. I only went twice a week. Wednesdays to help my mom with Bingo, she did it in English and I did it in Spanish. And then Sunday, we would all goes as a family. Two days a week for me was more than enough. It wasn’t so much the smell of stale urine that would get to you as the same conversation over and over again. The last few years of my grandmothers life we talked about green Jello every time I went.
See my grandmother was obsessed with the fact that she felt they were serving her lime Jello more than any of the other flavors of Jello. Her theory was that it was cheaper than all the other kinds of Jello. She had my mother go and complain to management time and time again(my didn’t really after so many times). If you would go eat with her and they served lime Jello, watch out, because you, and everyone else was going to hear about it. Now you know it has to be a pretty good facility when the only thing my grandmother could find to complain about was that she felt that they were getting lime Jello at a discount and pawning it off on the elderly. Taking that leftover saved Jello money(because you know how expensive Jello was) and buying all sorts of cars and vacations with them. I really hope my body goes to the great beyond before my mind does. :( As we never did convince her that she was getting the same amount of lime Jello as she was the other flavors of Jello.
The first time I had Lime Green Jello Salad my mother was experimenting at Easter. I say experiment because we liked our classics. My mother listed the ingredients and I raised and eyebrow. But I ate a square of that salad and I was hooked. After everyone left the table, my friend M(my mom always invited the strays over for holidays) and I sat finishing the Jello salad right from the pan. In fact we fought over it so much that my mom made us it again the next night(M ate over a lot in those days). And with that Green Jello Salad became a staple that was at the table every Easter. It is one of the few things I will only make once a year. Partly because I am ashamed to love such a concoction of such horrid ingredients and partly because I still eat the whole dish. I mean I made a pan of this last night as well as a couple in a parfait glass for Easter dinner. Literally half the pan is already gone and in my tummy. It’s so light and tasty, it is almost like eating air…kind of like me and rice krispy treats(which I also hardly make).
Hope everyone who was celebrating Easter has/had a good one!

Green Jello Salad

1 (6 ounce) package lime Jello
1 cup boiling water
1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, at room temperature
½ tsp vanilla extract
1 (15 ounce) can mandrian oranges, drained
1 (8 ounce) can crush pineapple, drained
1 cup Sprite(or other lemon-lime soda)
½ cup chopped pecans
1 (8 ounce) carton of Cool Whip, thawed, divided

Dissolve Jello in water. In a mixing bowl, beat the cream cheese and vanilla until fluffy. Stir in Jello and beat until smooth. Add pineapple, oranges, soda and pecans. Mix until incorporated. Chill the mixture in refrigerator for about 30-40 minutes, so that when you lift it with a spoon it is clumpy. Fold in ¾ of the Cool Whip.
Pour into a 9-x-13-inch pan or parfait glasses. Refrigerate for 3-4 hours or until firm. Garnish with remaining Cool Whip. If serving in pan, will make about 16 squares.

Comments

  1. Green Jello is a must in our extended family. My sweet mother-in-law used to make it; now it is my ‘thing.’ One year my mother-in-law made red jello with apples, cranberries and walnuts. The entire younger generation howled in outrage. It simply was NOT the holiday without her green jello. Poor thing was completely taken aback; but she never again missed making the green jello. btw, the red jello was actually pretty good. it just wasn’t green….

  2. Hi, Loved your post, and I’m ashamed to admit it, but this recipie actually sounds really good to me,lol. I’m gonna make it for Thanksgiving for my husband who loves lime Jello and son who loves Sprite. I used to live with my grandma who had Alzheimer’s. She would Call me “hey you”. One day I asked her if she had a grandaughter and said “yes her name is Debbie”, and I said “Grandma,I’m Debbie!”. Excitedly, she exclaimed you are?! Teary eyed she hugged me and happily said, “And all this time I thought you were the maid! An hour later she went back to “hey you”.

  3. Had a hankering for lime jell-o and been surfing the web for about 45 minutes. Ran across your recipe and cannot WAIT to make it this evening.

    Yes……I actually admitted I had a hankering for lime jell-o.

  4. My great aunt published a cookbook in the 1940′s which included a recipe for a “holiday salad” which consisted of green jello, little marshmallows, canned fruit salad, cream cheese, maybe condensed milk or whipping cream and there definitely was mayonaise. It was made in a ring mold and the mayonaise was like a garnish, plopped in the hole in the middle. It was considered some kind of adult dish; and we definitely did not like it as kids, but loved it as older teens and beyond. I have such a craving for it, and would appreciate getting the recipe — I can’t find the cookbook and my aunt published under a pseudonym out of Boston….

Trackbacks

  1. [...] A friend mentioned a pie topped with tiny colorful marshmallows.  Sounds like a great idea, right?  On the same day, Peabody posted a recipe for the most amazing and bizarre lime jello salad.  The fruity marshmallows were on sale at the grocery and the rest of the ingredients practically jumped out of the pantry.  I put everything on hold.  I just had to make this pie.   [...]

  2. [...] the Baker shifted Peabody’s Lime Jello Conspiracy Salad into pie form and added her own layer to the story. And now I’m adding [...]

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